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Advising Guide: Leadership Studies

General Information
Spring Registration Advising

Spring registration advising begins on Monday, October 22.

Students are expected to consult thoroughly and substantively with their Jepson academic advisors prior to registration. Ultimately, however, students are responsible for completing all general education, major, and minor requirements. Leadership studies requirements

The Cohort System: Prerequisites and Timing of Core Courses

The LDST required courses sequence is managed with prerequisites. Students are responsible for enrolling in the required courses in the appropriate semester.

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities and LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences must be taken by the end of sophomore year. LDST 205 Justice and Civil Society should be completed by this time as well. LDST 250 Critical Thinking and Methods of Inquiry must be taken in the spring of the sophomore year.

LDST 101, LDST 102, and LDST 250 are prerequisites for LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership. Unless studying abroad, students must take LDST 300 in the fall of the junior year.

LDST 300 is a prerequisite for LDST 450 Leadership Ethics, which must be taken in the fall of senior year. LDST 450 is not offered in the spring semester.

LDST 488 Internship should be taken in the spring of junior year (.5 units) and the fall of senior year (.5 units) for a total of 1 unit.

Registration Issues

Spring pre-registration for continuing students begins on Monday, October 29. Students are responsible for registering at their assigned times. Please carefully consult the registration rotation.

The Jepson School does not maintain waitlists for LDST courses. Students who wish to enroll in a course that is at capacity should monitor BannerWeb for openings. Other students frequently drop courses, and we also routinely increase caps in courses based on demand across sections. Students who have questions or face serious conflicts because of academic or athletic commitments should contact Dr. Hoyt. Students should not request entry into closed courses from professors, and professors receiving such requests should refer students to Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Crystal Hoyt.

Advanced Courses

This spring we are offering four special topic courses, as well as several Jepson electives we want to highlight.

Special Topic Courses

•LDST 390-01     MW 10:30-11:45 am    
ST: Behavioral Economics: Informing the Art of Giving, Volunteering, and Philanthropy—Dr. Haley Harwell
What motivates individuals to give time or money to a cause?  What type of people give money to charities? Which individuals volunteer their time? Throughout history humans have given time, money, and goods to help other people. Giving is shaped by different principles, abilities, capacities, political orientations, gender, religious affiliation, and needs. We will explore giving in the most general sense through the lens of behavioral economics. We will explore the reasons people give, ways people give, and what increases contributions to causes. We will explore and learn theories on why people behave in altruistic manners. This course will also explore how leadership and paternalism influence giving. We will also look at charitable organizations and identify what makes charities successful and how does that play a role in individual’s altruistic behaviors. The course is structured around three basic questions.  How can social science, specifically behavioral economics, help us to understand altruism and giving? How does leadership and paternalism influence individual’s altruistic behavior? How does one engage in philanthropy, and how can this be done well? By the end of the semester students should have knowledge that will allow them to have a deeper understanding of motivations and factors that influence giving.


•LDST 390-02    MW 12:00-1:15 pm    
ST: Living with Digital Technology: To Be Human in the Digital Era —Dr. Riddhi Bhandari
This course introduces participants to anthropology’s forays into studying digital technologies and how they impact people’s lives. The readings grapple with questions of what it means to be human in this digital era. Digital technologies—like mobile phones, computers, tablets, the internet, cameras, drones—have allowed humans to build upon existing technologies and create often novel forms of communication, representation, and interaction. Our use of digital technologies shapes processes of knowledge production—how we come to know and represent ourselves, others, and the world. Power, inequality, and political economic contexts continue to shape access to digital technologies, differentiated levels of visibility, and levels of participation in the creation, circulation, and consumption of information and technology. Across the globe, people have employed digital technologies to create spaces for representation and belonging, document and share experiences, and contest their marginalization; as well as to participate in violence and exclusion. Through digital technologies we have perhaps gained new forms of interpersonal, intergroup, cross-cultural, and even interspecies interactions. As we surround ourselves by and participate in ever-developing technologies, how does this shift what it means to be human—the perennial concern of anthropology? As much as digital technologies raise new questions, we often find ourselves circling back to familiar inquiries into human interaction, communication, relations of power, and global connection.


•LDST 390-03    TR 10:30-11:45 am
ST: The Democratic Prospect—Dr. Ken Ruscio
This course examines the state of American democracy by reviewing key historical periods and philosophical disputes that shaped the system and the expectations we have for leaders. Fundamental democratic principles are currently being questioned and even challenged. Interpreting and responding to those challenges are among the objectives of the course. The course will begin with contemporary assessments of the current condition of democracy. We will then step back to study key stages in its development (such as the Founding Period, the Civil War and emancipation, the export of democracy, and the women’s and civil rights movements) and important statements that framed central features, such as the rule of law, accountability, citizenship, equality, freedom, and rights. Within such a complex system—complex in its structure, values, and norms—what kind of political leadership is called for?  What qualities and characteristics make for a good leader in a democracy? Empowering leaders while also constraining them is an ongoing dilemma for American democracy. How has that dilemma been resolved in theory and in practice over time and especially now? This is fundamentally a course in American democratic theory as revealed through the statements and actions of key individuals during critical periods. The goal is for each student to acquire a deep understanding of what we mean by democracy, its present condition and future prospects.


•LDST 390-04     TR 3:00-4:15 pm
ST: Media and Politics—Dr. Allison Archer
The media play a crucial role in American politics. Long known as the “fourth estate,” the Founders enumerated press protections largely because the media help us monitor those in power and hold leaders accountable. Since those days, the media landscape has changed in many ways (e.g., social media) yet also remained very much the same (e.g., partisan news). This course will provide an overview of the media’s role in American politics with a special focus on implications for leadership. We’ll cover several large themes: the role of the press in a democracy; how media help (and don’t help) us hold leaders accountable; media owners and the business of news; how media affect our understanding of leaders, policies, and groups in society (including misinformation and “fake news”); and the role of technology in the news. Special attention will be paid to empirical studies in political science and communication, as well as writings in the popular press.


Other Jepson Electives


•LDST 306-01    MW 3:00-4:15 pm
Sex, Leadership, and the Evolution of Human Societies—Dr. Chris von Rueden
This course explores how biological and cultural adaptation shape leadership and, more broadly, political organization. Through case studies drawn from primatology, cultural anthropology, and political history, students will learn what makes human leadership unique and investigate why leadership and political organization vary across human and non-human societies. Some of the questions we consider include: Why do humans adopt leader and follower roles at all? What is the political organization of other social animals, particularly the great apes? Are there any human societies that lack leadership? Are there societies in which, on average, women wield more power than men? Why are some human societies more hierarchical than others? The goal of the course is not only to expose students to the diversity of political organization in humans and other animals, but also to stimulate them to think critically about the ultimate causes of human social behavior in general.


•LDST 352-01    MW 1:30-2:45 pm
Presidential Leadership—Dr. Al Goethals
This course examines theories of presidential leadership and assessments of several presidencies, including those of George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton. Students will address the personal qualities and capacities as well as the situational and historical contingencies that influence the effectiveness of various presidencies. Also, students will consider the nature of social perception and its role in appraisals of presidential performance. Special attention will be given to presidential campaigning and presidential debates. Each student will undertake the study of one or more presidents. Primary focus historical. [Same as PSYC 449.]


•LDST 355-01    T 3:00-5:40 pm
Competition, Cooperation, and Choice—Dr. Sandra Peart
An economic approach to leadership examines how individuals come together in social settings (a market place, an organization, a political entity) to make distributive decisions. This course begins with Adam Smith’s analysis of the development of modern industrial society and on important policy debates about slavery, the franchise, and eugenics. Smithian insights are the second major focus. Contemporary game theoretic and experimental research examine how cooperative behavior emerges in a setting where individual interests sometimes conflict with the interest of the group (or society). The prisoners’ dilemma game will be an important cornerstone of our investigations along these lines. We consider what institutional frameworks most facilitate cooperation in a repeated prisoner’s dilemma setting: competition, repetition, punishment and reciprocity. Finally, we will look at public goods games, in which players choose to cooperate or not; and see what mechanisms facilitate cooperation in this setting. As such, the class will have an experimental emphasis -- so that we can in and of ourselves come to better understand some Smith’s insights, the “theoretical” pieces of leadership and economics. Primary focus ethical.  Prerequisities: ECON 101  [Cross-listed with ECON 260]


•LDST 357-01    W 3:00-5:40 pm
The Ethics of Influence—Dr. Terry Price
This course examines the moral limits on the exercise of influence. Perhaps the most important part of a leader’s job is getting people to do things; which raises the question: what means and techniques are leaders justified in using? Perhaps rational persuasion is the most obvious candidate as the ideal form of influence, but it is not without its own problems. So what about all the other means and techniques of influence? Are they prohibited by morality and, if so, on what grounds? People would likely agree that ethical leadership does not permit coercing followers or outright lying to them. In fact, we do not typically refer to the use of force as influence, let alone as leadership. But is it permissible to engage in deception that falls short of lying? Or to bypass reason with appeals to emotion? To answer these questions and many like them, we will begin with classic texts detailing the influence tactics leaders actually use—and use effectively. Our first task, then, will be to identify the behaviors under investigation. To assess the morality of the influence tactics, we will draw on traditional moral theory as well as on contemporary philosophical literature, especially on manipulation. In the last part of the course, we will take an extended look at the morality of public policy efforts to influence behavior with “nudges.”  


•LDST 361-01    T 6:00-8:40 pm
Sex, Power, and Politics—Dr. Lauranett Lee
This course explores the historical landscape as it intersects with issues regarding sex, power, and politics.  We begin with documentary evidence, the General Assembly of Virginia’s legislation in 1662 regarding enslaved women, reproduction rights, and race.  Following a survey of key historical moments, the course concludes with an exploration of current issues and those who are deemed powerless, those who wield power and those who challenge power. 


•LDST 378-01    WF 12:00-1:15 pm
Statemanship—Dr. Daniel Schillinger
Statesmanship remains a useful concept for those who want to recognize, to study, or to become a worthy political leader acting on a grand scale. But who exactly is the so-called statesman? What does he or she do? And is there not something troublingly old-fashioned or even anti-democratic about the language and practice of statesmanship? This course returns to the history of political thought in order to examine the characters and the activities of statesmen. We will also consider the circumstances that call forth statesmanship, the relation of statesmanship to (democratic) citizenship, and the contrast between statesmen and demagogues. While the course will begin with attention to the enduring philosophical and historical perspectives on statesmanship found in the works of Thucydides, Plato, and Machiavelli, we will then reflect on specifically American statesmanship as it comes to light in the writings and speeches of Alexis de Tocqueville, James Madison, Frederick Douglass, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.


•LDST 384-01    TR 12:00-1:15 pm
Education and Equity—Dr. Tom Shields
This course will examine the historical, sociological, and biological roles that poverty and class play in the American K-12 education system. We will look at the influencers associated with poverty and class and how these impact cognitive development and physical well-being in childhood and adolescence. We will also discuss the widening academic achievement gap between the rich and the poor and how educational expectations and achievement are changing based on socio-economic status. The course will conclude with a focus on the recent labor market effects that have led to the creation of an underclass in the U.S. that is not properly trained nor adequately educated for a changing 21st Century economy.


Students may find a list of all advanced and required courses offered in spring 2019 by viewing the provisional course schedule. Course descriptions can be found in the undergraduate catalog.

Information for Seniors
Class of 2019

Senior Degree Audits
All seniors should have received an audit package from the Registrar’s office. Students should complete the relevant forms and bring a printed copy of the GradTracker audit to their major advisor to verify and sign at the advising meeting. Please check to be sure that all general education requirements have been met, as well as the requirements of the major(s) and minor(s). Advisors are encouraged to consult GradTracker to confirm the contents of the audit. Both majors and minors should submit the leadership studies forms in the Jepson drop box (located outside of Jepson Hall, Room 122), no later than November 1 at noon for final verification by Dr. Hoyt. The student is ultimately responsible for returning this form to the registrar. (All forms are due to the registrar by November 15.)

Jepson Internship (LDST 488) Requirement--For Majors ONLY
The Jepson School requires all majors to complete 240 hours in a Jepson-approved summer internship in the summer following their junior year. The internship provides the means to help students translate theory into practice. In addition to field work, students will complete several written assignments where they connect theory to practice and reflect on their experience and will submit a final portfolio. Seniors are required to complete 1 unit of LDST 488 their senior year in order to graduate.

Business Students
The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Student Research
Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis.

  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. Independent study proposals under this rubric must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member's program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt by the end of the add/drop period.
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision, in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.
  • LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis allows students to pursue research on their own topic of interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Proposals for LDST 495/496 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.

Forms for these three courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Honors
Honors students should enroll in LDST 498 Senior Honors Thesis II.

Study Abroad
Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. It should not be at the introductory level. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by Dr. Hoyt in consultation with the advisor. The Leadership Studies Request for Study Abroad Credit form can be found on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides. Students must also complete the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available on the Registrar’s website. This form must also be signed by the student’s primary advisor.

Information for Juniors
Class of 2020

Theories and Models of Leadership
Juniors studying abroad in the fall must register for LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership in the spring. Students returning from abroad will have registration priority for the spring sections.

Jepson Internship (LDST 488) Requirement—For Majors Only
The Jepson School requires all majors to complete 240 hours in a Jepson-approved summer internship in the summer following their junior year. The internship provides the means to help students translate theory into practice. In addition to field work, students will take LDST 488 (.5 units) in the spring before their internship, and again in the fall following their internship. In all, students are required to take 1 unit total of LDST 488 in order to graduate with a degree in leadership studies. Several written assignments will connect theory to practice and allow students the chance to reflect on their internship experience.

Student Research
Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis I and II, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis I and II. Independent research for academic credit requires the approval of the associate dean for academic affairs.

  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. LDST 490 proposals must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.                                   
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member’s program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt by the end of the add/drop period.  
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision, in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.
  • LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis allows students to pursue research on their own topic of interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Proposals for LDST 495/496 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.

Forms for these courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Business Students
The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Study Abroad

Junior majors, but not minors, may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the senior associate dean for academic affairs. Students must complete the leadership studies Request for Study Abroad Credit as well as the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available through the University Registrar's Office.


Junior Honors Tutorial
Juniors who have applied and been accepted into the honors program should sign up for the LDST 399 Junior Honors Tutorial.

Information for Sophomores
Class of 2021

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities and LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences
Newly admitted students must complete LDST 101 and LDST 102 by the end of sophomore year.

LDST 250 Critical Thinking
Sophomores must sign up for LDST 250 in the spring.

LDST 205 Justice and Civil Society
Sophomores who have not yet taken LDST 205 should sign up for this course in the spring.

Business Students
The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement. 

Study Abroad
Sophomore majors, but not minors, may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the senior associate dean for academic affairs. Students must complete the leadership studies Request for Study Abroad Credit as well as the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available through the University Registrar's Office.

Advisors and Advising
Sophomore majors will be assigned Jepson advisors in the near future. For the spring term registration, you will remain as an advisee of your current advisor. You will consult with your new Jepson advisor during registration this spring. If you have questions concerning Jepson School courses in the meantime, please contact Dr. Kerstin Soderlund or Dr. Crystal Hoyt. Jepson minors should also consult with Dr. Soderlund or Dr. Hoyt about course scheduling.

Questions?

For general academic questions:

Dr. Crystal Hoyt
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Jepson Hall 132
choyt@richmond.edu
Office: (804) 287-6825