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Advising Guide: Leadership Studies

General Information
Spring 2021 Registration Advising

Spring registration advising begins on Monday, November 2.

Students are expected to consult thoroughly and substantively with their Jepson academic advisors prior to registration. Ultimately, however, students are responsible for completing all general education, major, and minor requirements. Leadership studies requirements

The Cohort System: Prerequisites and Timing of Core Courses

The LDST required courses sequence is managed with prerequisites. Students are responsible for enrolling in the required courses in the appropriate semester.

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities and LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences must be taken by the end of sophomore year. LDST 210 Justice and Civil Society should be completed by this time as well.

All LDST students will need to be enrolled in 249 Quantitative Social Sciences and/or LDST 250 Critical Thinking and Methods of Inquiry in the spring of their sophomore year. Beginning with the Class of 2023, LDST 249 will be a required course. LDST 249 and LDST 250 should be completed by the end of junior year--in advance of or inconjuction with LDST 300 (which is taken during junior year).

LDST 101, 102, 249, and 250 are prerequisites for LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership. Unless studying abroad, students must take LDST 300 in the fall of the junior year.

LDST 300 is a prerequisite for LDST 450 Leadership Ethics, which must be taken in the fall of senior year. LDST 450 is not offered in the spring semester.

LDST 488 Internship should be taken in the spring of junior year (.5 units) and the fall of senior year (.5 units) for a total of 1 unit.

Registration Issues

Spring pre-registration for continuing students begins on Monday, November 9. Students are responsible for registering at their assigned times. Please carefully consult the registration rotation.

Students should not request entry into closed courses from professors, and professors receiving such requests should refer students to Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Crystal Hoyt.

The Jepson School does not maintain waitlists for LDST required courses, however we will offer waitlisting on our elective courses. If waitlisting is available, waitlisted seats will be displayed in BannerWeb. Students who wish to enroll in a course that is at capacity should monitor BannerWeb for openings. Other students frequently drop courses, and we also routinely increase caps in courses based on demand across sections. Students who have questions or face serious conflicts because of academic or athletic commitments, or time zone issues, should contact Dr. Hoyt.

Advanced Courses

This spring we are offering five special topic courses, as well as several Jepson electives we want to highlight.

Special Topic Courses

• LDST 390-01 M 12:45-3:25 pm ONLINE
Special Topics: Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights
—Dr. David Wilkins
This course introduces you to, and more importantly, then requires you to analyze U.S. domestic policy and federal law as it pertains to Native nations as the original sovereign peoples in the U.S. and to their individual citizens/members. In Part1 we engage in a critical analysis of the principal actors--Native nations (including the status of individual Indians), federal, and state governments--involved in this distinctive government-to-government and intergovernmental relationship. We also discuss the role that activism, the media, and organizations--both governmental and non-governmental (i.e., interest groups, the public, etc.)-- play in the development or hindering of Native peoples and federal Indian policy, law, and governance. In Part 2 of the course, we generally examine the historical development of the major federal Indian policy eras and the initiatives generated during those periods from before the beginning of the Republic to the present. Finally, in Part 3 we engage in a focused examination of several specific indigenous policy issues and other topics: religious freedom, economic development, federal recognition, the contentious status of treaty rights, and international developments--topics that are particularly important at the moment. We conclude the course by suggesting some possible policy avenues the different sovereigns might consider to improve intergovernmental relations.

• LDST 390-02 MW 4:15-5:30 pm
Special Topics: Living a Life of Consequence: Self-Discovery and Social Change
—Dr. Craig Kocher
This course will engage the ethical, creative, and reflective imaginations of students by examining various models of social engagement, and different pathways to self-discovery, in light of the significant social challenges of our time. The material will encourage students to explore the intersections between their lived experience and ideas about leadership, ethics, and social change.

• LDST 390-03
TR 2:30-3:45 pm ONLINE
Special Topics: Behavioral and Experimental Economics and Leadership
—Dr. Haley HarwellIn this class, we will explore leadership in the most general sense through the lens of behavioral and experimental economics. This course will be a survey of some of the recent literature in behavioral and experiential economics and illustrate the methods used within these growing fields of economics. For the last 30 years, economists have been running controlled experiments to learn about economic behavior; literally, thousands of studies have been run. We will discuss some of the most relevant studies to explore leadership through a lens of economic behavior and decision making. We will discuss topics that include decision-making under uncertainty and risk, social preferences, trust, fairness, empathy, social pressure, charitable giving, biased beliefs, discrimination, self-selection, and gender differences. This course will explore how leadership influences individual economic decision making. Students will also be provided with a working knowledge of proper techniques for conducting experiments. By the end of the semester, students should have knowledge that will allow them to have a deeper understanding of behavioral and experimental economics with respect to leadership and followership.

• LDST 390-04 F 11:00 am-1:40 pm
Special Topics: Reimagining Success: Science, Society, & Innovation
—Dr. Rana Dajani
“We are in a pickle” Says the contemplating frog… In this course, we will embark on a journey of discovery to reimagine success. Through case studies, stories and interviews we will explore varying perspectives of what success means and how it varies across cultures, religions, ethnicities, geographies and histories, challenging our own assumptions and unconscious biases along the way. We will use science to inform the questions we will ask such as; who defines success, what are the forms of success, how we can reimagine success, why does success differ and how does it vary, how wild can we go? We will draw upon our humanity and ethical values in this digital age to capture what success may look like. Through a series of hands on activities including storytelling, art, drama, games and community action; students will be constantly challenging themselves while having fun to discover their own agency and to stimulate innovation. The goal of the course is not only to challenge assumptions among students but also to stimulate them to think critically about the trajectories of human behavior in general and more importantly to change mindsets to become innovative changemakers within their own circles by adopting a human centered design approach.

• LDST 390-05 W 6:00-8:40 pm
Special Topics: Capitalism, Community Wealth Building, and the Future of Democracy
—Dr. Thad Williamson
Twenty-first-century humanity faces daunting challenges, many of which are driven by or closely related to the dynamics of modern capitalism. This course consists of three components: critical scholarly assessments of modern capitalism and its compatibility with socio-economic justice, racial justice, ecological sustainability, and democratic institutions; consideration of serious attempts to sketch how capitalism might be reformed, restructured, or replaced to meet the challenges facing 21st-century humanity; and consideration of community-wealth-building efforts underway locally, nationally, and globally which seek to establish a new paradigm for political and economic reform. Authors studied will include economists, historians, political scientists, and others. (Cross-listed with PPEL 381)

 

Other Jepson Electives

 

 • LDST 306-01 MW 2:30-3:45 pm
Sex, Leadership, and the Evolution of Human Societies—Dr. Chris von Rueden
This course explores how biological and cultural adaptation shape leadership and, more broadly, political organization. Through case studies drawn from primatology, cultural anthropology, and political history, students will learn what makes human leadership unique and investigate why leadership and political organization vary across human and non-human societies. Some of the questions we consider include: Why do humans adopt leader and follower roles at all? What is the political organization of other social animals, particularly the great apes? Are there any human societies that lack leadership? Are there societies in which, on average, women wield more power than men? Why are some human societies more hierarchical than others? The goal of the course is not only to expose students to the diversity of political organization in humans and other animals, but also to stimulate them to think critically about the ultimate causes of human social behavior in general.

• LDST 317-01 TR 9:15-10:30 am
Reimagining Richmond: History, Power, & Politics in the Former Capital of the Confederacy—Dr. Julian Hayter
This course focuses on Richmond, Virginia’s political history from Reconstruction to twilight of the 20th century. More specifically, we will use politics as a vehicle to interrogate how Richmonders organized strategies to meet economic, political, and social challenges following the Civil War and how movements for civil rights transformed local power relationships. Broadly, this course examines the ways historical actors transformed America’s cities over the last century and how national/state/local policies affected local people’s lives. To this end, we will study Southern labor relations, the rise and fall of Jim Crow segregation, the American civil rights movement, and the long arc of 20th century urban and racial history.

• LDST 346-01 TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm
The Democratic Prospect—Dr. Ken Ruscio
What is the future of democracy? This course assesses the state of American democracy and its future prospects by reviewing key historical and philosophical disputes that shaped the system and the expectations we have for leaders. Fundamental democratic principles are being questioned and even challenged. Interpreting and responding to those challenges are among the objectives of the course. The course will review the current condition of democracy, as seen through the eyes of several writers, as well as key stages in its development (such as the Founding Period, the Civil War and emancipation, the export of democracy, and the women’s and civil rights movements.) Within such a complex system—complex in its structure, values, and norms—what kind of political leadership is called for? The goal is for each student to acquire a deep understanding of what we mean by democracy, its present condition and future prospects. (Cross-listed with PLSC 379)

• LDST 377-01 TR 9:15-10:30 am ONLINE
Ethical Decision Making in Healthcare—Dr. Samuel Director
This course provides a systematic examination of the central ethical decisions faced by health workers and leaders in the health care industry. Topics include informed consent, decision making for incompetent patients, moral status, abortion, euthanasia, disability, resource allocation, artificial intelligence in medicine, and human enhancement. Readings by bioethicists such as Peter Singer, Judith Jarvis Thompson, and Rebecca Dresser. Primary focus ethical.

• LDST 384-01 TR 12:45-2:00 pm
Education & Equity—Dr. Tom Shields
This course will examine the historical, sociological, and biological roles that poverty and class play in the American K-12 education system. We will look at the influencers associated with poverty and class and how these impact cognitive development and physical well-being in childhood and adolescence. We will also discuss the widening academic achievement gap between the rich and the poor and how educational expectations and achievement are changing based on socio-economic status. The course will conclude with a focus on the recent labor market effects that have led to the creation of an underclass in the U.S. that is not properly trained nor adequately educated for a changing 21st Century economy.

Information for Seniors
Class of 2021

Senior Degree Audits
All seniors will receive an audit package from the registrar’s office in October. Students should complete the relevant form(s) and forward to their major advisor to verify and sign at their advising meeting. Please check to be sure that all general education requirements have been met, as well as the requirements of the major(s) and minor(s). Advisors are encouraged to consult GradTracker to confirm the contents of the audit. Both majors and minors should forward their completed Jepson School form to Administrative Coordinator Michele Bedsaul. She will take care of preparing them for final verification by Dr. Hoyt. The student is ultimately responsible for returning this form to the registrar. All forms are due to the registrar in November (date to be confirmed).

Jepson Internship (LDST 488) Requirement--For Majors ONLY
The Jepson School requires all majors to complete 240 hours in a Jepson-approved summer internship in the summer following their junior year. The internship provides the means to help students translate theory into practice. In addition to field work, students will take LDST 488 (.5 units) in the spring before
their internship, and again in the fall following their internship. In all, students are required to take 1 unit total of LDST 488 in order to graduate with a degree in leadership studies.

Business Students
The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Student Research
Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis.

  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. Independent study proposals under this rubric must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member's program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt by the end of the add/drop period.
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision, in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.
  • LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis allows students to pursue research on their own topic of interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Proposals for LDST 495/496 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.

Forms for these three courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Honors
Honors students should enroll in LDST 498 Senior Honors Thesis II.

Study Abroad & Study Outside of Jepson
Majors (but not minors) may count a maximum of one unit of study abroad credit, or one unit taken at the University of Richmond outside of the Jepson School, toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. It should not be at the introductory level. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the Academic Affairs Committee in consultation with the student’s advisor. The Leadership Studies Request for Study Abroad Credit form can be found on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides/Study Abroad, as well as the Jepson School’s Transfer Course Approval form. Please submit all paperwork and/or study abroad questions to Michele Bedsaul (mbedsaul@richmond.edu). Study abroad students must also complete the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, available on the registrar’s website. This form must also be signed by the student’s primary advisor.

Information for Juniors
Class of 2022

Theories and Models of Leadership
Juniors who have not yet taken LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership must register for LDST 300 in the spring. Normally (pre-Covid), students returning from abroad would be given priority for the spring sections.

Jepson Internship (LDST 488) Requirement—For Majors Only
The Jepson School requires all majors to complete 240 hours in a Jepson-approved summer internship in the summer following their junior year. The internship provides the means to help students translate theory into practice. In addition to field work, students will take LDST 488 (.5 units) in the spring before their internship, and again in the fall following their internship. In all, students are required to take 1 unit total of LDST 488 in order to graduate with a degree in leadership studies. Several written assignments will connect theory to practice and allow students the chance to reflect on their internship experience.

Student Research
Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis I and II, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis I and II. Independent research for academic credit requires the approval of the associate dean for academic affairs.

  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. LDST 490 proposals must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.                                   
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member’s program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt by the end of the add/drop period.  
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision, in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.
  • LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis allows students to pursue research on their own topic of interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Proposals for LDST 495/496 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.

Forms for these courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Business Students
Beginning with the class of 2022, the Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 394 Business Ethics. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 394 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Study Abroad & Study Outside of Jepson

Majors (but not minors) may count a maximum of one unit of study abroad credit, or one unit taken at the University of Richmond outside of the Jepson School, toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. It should not be at the introductory level. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the Academic Affairs Committee in consultation with the student’s advisor. The Leadership Studies Request for Study Abroad Credit form can be found on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides/Study Abroad, as well as the Jepson School’s Transfer Course Approval form. Please submit all paperwork and/or study abroad questions to Michele Bedsaul (mbedsaul@richmond.edu). Study abroad students must also complete the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, available on the registrar’s website. This form must also be signed by the student’s primary advisor.

Junior Honors Tutorial
Juniors who have applied and been accepted into the honors program should sign up for the LDST 399 Junior Honors Tutorial.

Information for Sophomores
Class of 2023

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities and LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences
Newly admitted students must complete LDST 101 and LDST 102 by the end of sophomore year.

LDST 250 Critical Thinking & LDST 249 Quantitative Social Sciences
Sophomores must sign up for either LDST 249 or LDST 250 in the spring. Both LDST 249 and LDST 250 should be completed by the end of junior year—in advance of or in conjunction with LDST 300.

LDST 210 Justice and Civil Society
Sophomores who have not yet taken LDST 210 should ideally sign up for this course in the spring. This course can be completed at any time before the end of junior year.

Business Students
Beginning with the class of 2022, the Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 394 Business Ethics. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 394 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Study Abroad & Study Outside of Jepson
Majors (but not minors) may count a maximum of one unit of study abroad credit, or one unit taken at the University of Richmond outside of the Jepson School, toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. It should not be at the introductory level. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the Academic Affairs Committee in consultation with the student’s advisor. The Leadership Studies Request for Study Abroad Credit form can be found on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides/Study Abroad, as well as the Jepson School’s Transfer Course Approval form. Please submit all paperwork and/or study abroad questions to Michele Bedsaul (mbedsaul@richmond.edu). Study abroad students must also complete the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, available on the registrar’s website. This form must also be signed by the student’s primary advisor.

Advisors and Advising
Sophomore majors will be assigned Jepson advisors in the near future. For the spring term registration, you will remain as an advisee of your current advisor. You will consult with your new Jepson advisor during registration this spring. If you have questions concerning Jepson School courses in the meantime, please contact Dr. Kerstin Soderlund or Dr. Crystal Hoyt. Jepson minors should also consult with Dr. Soderlund or Dr. Hoyt about course scheduling.

Questions?

For general academic questions:

Dr. Crystal Hoyt
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Jepson Hall 132
choyt@richmond.edu
Office: (804) 287-6825