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Advising Guide: Leadership Studies

General Information
Fall Registration Advising

Fall registration advising begins on Monday, March 25.

Students are expected to consult thoroughly and substantively with their Jepson academic advisors prior to registration. Ultimately, however, students are responsible for completing all general education, major, and minor requirements. Leadership studies requirements

The Cohort System: Prerequisites and Timing of Core Courses

The LDST required courses sequence is managed with prerequisites. Students are responsible for enrolling in the required courses in the appropriate semester.

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities and LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences must be taken by the end of sophomore year. LDST 210 Justice and Civil Society should be completed by this time as well. LDST 250 Critical Thinking and Methods of Inquiry must be taken in the spring of the sophomore year.

LDST 101, LDST 102, and LDST 250 are prerequisites for LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership. Unless studying abroad, students must take LDST 300 in the fall of the junior year.

LDST 300 is a prerequisite for LDST 450 Leadership Ethics, which must be taken in the fall of senior year. LDST 450 is not offered in the spring semester.

LDST 488 Internship should be taken in the spring of junior year (.5 units) and the fall of senior year (.5 units) for a total of 1 unit.

Registration Issues

Fall pre-registration for continuing students begins on Monday, April 1. Students are responsible for registering at their assigned times. Please carefully consult the registration rotation.

The Jepson School does not maintain waitlists for LDST courses. Students who wish to enroll in a course that is at capacity should monitor BannerWeb for openings. Other students frequently drop courses, and we also routinely increase caps in courses based on demand across sections. Students who have questions or face serious conflicts because of academic or athletic commitments should contact Dr. Hoyt. Students should not request entry into closed courses from professors, and professors receiving such requests should refer students to Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Crystal Hoyt.

Advanced Courses

This fall we are offering three special topic courses, as well as several Jepson electives we want to highlight.

Special Topic Courses

•LDST 390-01    MW 12:00-1:15 pm
Special Topics: “With God on Our Side”: Religion, Politics & American Public Life—Dr. Corey Walker
From war memorials to public school curricula to displays in public buildings, religion raises a number of substantive issues for politics and American public life. This seminar will focus on the complex and contested relationships between religion, politics, and American public life with an acute focus on the closing decades of the twentieth and opening decades of the twenty-first centuries. The seminar will critically examine the significant conceptual, methodological, philosophical, and political issues in this contested arena. Seminar topics include religion and democracy; religion, race, and public life; religion, politics, and capitalism; and religion and democracy in an age of political extremes.

•LDST 390-02    TR 10:30-11:45 am
Special Topics: Accountability: The Limits of Power in a Democracy—Dr. Ken Ruscio
A premise of American democracy is that political power is constrained, and therefore leaders who exercise political power must be held accountable. It is a defining feature of our political system that has led to complex institutional structures and other elaborate mechanisms to achieve accountability. The very structure of our constitutional system arises from this central premise, but also legislatively enacted provisions flow from it. Those include, as examples, the War Powers Act, the Inspector General Act, and the establishment of the Government Accountability Office. There is also the ultimate question of impeachment. What are the connections between theory and practice? Underlying this approach is a fundamental leadership dilemma: what qualities must leaders have to be effective in a complex system of constrained formal powers?

•LDST 390-03     TR 3:00-4:15 pm
Special Topics: Culture and Resistance: Race, Gender, Power, & Pop Culture—Dr. Kristin Bezio
What we understand as “popular culture”—today associated with movies, television, Netflix, and videogames—is often dismissed as irrelevant entertainment. However, studies in the social sciences have recently begun to demonstrate what those in the humanities and in pop culture studies have been arguing for decades: pop culture not only reflects our understanding of who we are and what we imagine for the future, but also exerts considerable influence over our gendered and racial identities, as well as our futures. In this course, we will look at examples of influential Western pop culture in context, examining how those works of entertainment did change the world around them, beginning with Robin Hood and Shakespeare, and moving through American Abolition and the Civil Rights Movement to Cold War dystopias and into the modern day. Students will have a chance to help choose some of the works the class will examine.

Other Jepson Electives

•LDST 307-01    WF 1:30-2:45 pm
Leadership in International Contexts—Dr. Javier Hidalgo
This course will focus on the ethics of international leadership. We will consider ethical questions relating to leadership in war, global poverty, international business ethics, global bioethics, and so on. In other words, we will clarify and try to answer ethical questions relating to international affairs that leaders and followers confront in politics, the military, business, and the nonprofit sectors. This course has two major parts. In the first part of the course, we will focus on leadership in war. In the second part of the course, we will focus mostly on ethical problems relating to global poverty and inequality.

•LDST 317-01    TR 12:00-1:15 pm
Reimagining Richmond: History, Power, & Politics in the Former Capital of the Confederacy—Dr. Julian Hayter
This course focuses on Richmond, Virginia’s political history from Reconstruction to twilight of the 20th century. More specifically, we will use politics as a vehicle to interrogate how Richmonders organized strategies to meet economic, political, and social challenges following the Civil War and how movements for civil rights transformed local power relationships.  Broadly, this course examines the ways historical actors transformed America’s cities over the last century and how national/state/local policies affected local people’s lives. To this end, we will study Southern labor relations, the rise and fall of Jim Crow segregation, the American civil rights movement, and the long arc of 20th century urban and racial history.

•LDST 345-01    MW 3:00-4:15 pm
Civil War Leadership—Dr. Al Goethals and General Jack Mountcastle
This course explores the military and political leadership of the American Civil War of 1861-1865. It examines the war’s political and social context, its military history, the evolving aims of the fighting, and the central actors and events that shape our understanding of leadership. The instructors, one a social psychologist and the other a Brigadier General and military historian, lecture on present material on occasion. For the most part, however, our class sessions are devoted to discussion of each day’s reading. A highlight of the semester will be a trip to Gettysburg.

•LDST 351-01    TR 3:00-4:15 pm
Group Dynamics—Dr. Don Forsyth
This course is an introduction to scientific study of group processes and will examine such topics as formation, cohesion, development, structure, social influence, power and obedience, leadership, performance, teams, decision making, conflict, and intergroup relations. The course will be a hybrid, or blended, class, because it will include both online elements and offline (face-to-face) classroom-based interaction. This class will not be a good fit for you personally  if you dislike working with others in groups or are uninterested in researched-based approaches to leadership.

•LDST 361-01    T 4:30-7:10 pm
Sex, Power, and Politics—Dr. Lauranett Lee
This course explores the historical landscape as it intersects with issues regarding sex, power, and politics.  We begin with documentary evidence, the General Assembly of Virginia’s legislation in 1662 regarding enslaved women, reproduction rights, and race.  Following a survey of key historical moments, the course concludes with an exploration of current issues and those who are deemed powerless, those who wield power and those who challenge power. 

•LDST 386-01    TR 9:00-10:15 am
Leadership in a Diverse Society—Dr. Crystal Hoyt
The goal of this course, broadly, is to understand how diversity affects social relations. To this end, we will examine diversity primarily through the lens of social psychology. Our focus will be on exploring inequalities and biases associated with difference; we will focus primarily on large societal groups that differ on cultural dimensions of identity such as gender, sexuality, and race and ethnicity. Traditional approaches to understanding diversity often located the root of inequality in overt negative attitudes. However, contemporary research into prejudice reveals that it is also often expressed in much more nuanced and subtle ways and it persists because it remains largely unrecognized. Our explorations will be based on theory and empirical evidence and we will apply this theoretical and empirical work to current events and relevant policy issues. After establishing a context for studying diversity we will explore underlying beliefs and motivations associated with diversity dynamics. Next, we will take the target’s perspective in understanding bias followed by an exploration of interaction dynamics. Finally, we turn to investigating how bias matters for policy issues including immigration, employment, education, health and criminal justice contexts.  (Cross-listed with PSYC 359.)


Students may find a list of all advanced and required courses offered in fall 2019 by viewing the provisional course schedule. Course descriptions can be found in the undergraduate catalog.

Information for Seniors
Class of 2020

Important Note About Leadership Ethics

Senior majors and minors must enroll in LDST 450 Leadership Ethics in the fall semester. This course will not be offered next spring; so if you do not take LDST 450 in the fall, you will be unable to graduate with a degree in leadership studies. There are no exceptions to this rule or substitutes for meeting this requirement.

Business Students

The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies.  BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Student Research

Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis.

  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. Independent study proposals under this rubric must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member's program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt by the end of the add/drop period.
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision, in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.
  • LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis provides students with the opportunity to work on a year-long independent research project of their choosing under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Proposals for LDST 495/496 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the senior thesis is to take place.

Forms for these three courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Honors

Honors students should enroll in LDST 497 Senior Honors Thesis I.

Study Abroad

Majors (but not minors) may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. It should not be at the introductory level. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by Dr. Hoyt in consultation with the student's advisor. Students must complete the leadership studies Request for Study Abroad Credit as well as the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available through the University Registrar's Office. Please direct all paperwork and study abroad questions to Michele Bedsaul.

Jepson Internship (LDST 488) Requirement—For Majors Only

The Jepson School requires all majors to complete 240 hours in a Jepson-approved summer internship in the summer following their junior year. The internship provides the means to help students translate theory into practice. In addition to field work, students will take LDST 488 (.5 units) in the spring before their internship, and again in the fall following their internship. In all, students are required to take 1 unit total of LDST 488 in order to graduate with a degree in leadership studies.

Information for Juniors
Class of 2021

Theories and Models of Leadership

Juniors not studying abroad in the fall must register for LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership. Students returning from abroad in the spring will have registration priority for the spring sections.

Business Students

The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Student Research

Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis I and II, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis I and II. Independent research for academic credit requires the approval of the associate dean for academic affairs.
  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. LDST 490 proposals must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.                                   
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member’s program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt by the end of the add/drop period.  
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision,  in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.
  • LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis provides students with the opportunity to work on a year-long independent research project of their choosing under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Proposals for LDST 495/496 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the senior thesis is to take place.

Forms for these courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Jepson Internship (LDST 488) Requirement—For Majors Only

The Jepson School requires all majors to complete 240 hours in a Jepson-approved summer internship in the summer following their junior year. The internship provides the means to help students translate theory into practice. In addition to field work, students will take LDST 488 (.5 units) in the spring before their internship, and again in the fall following their internship. In all, students are required to take 1 unit total of LDST 488 in order to graduate with a degree in leadership studies.

Study Abroad

Junior majors, but not minors, may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the senior associate dean for academic affairs. Students must complete the leadership studies Request for Study Abroad Credit as well as the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available through the University Registrar's Office. Please submit all paperwork and/or study abroad questions to Michele Bedsaul.

Information for Sophomores
Class of 2022

Students interested in joining the Jepson School as a major or minor must complete LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities or LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences by the end of fall semester of second year. Students who have taken LDST 101 should consider registering for LDST 102 and/or LDST 210 Justice and Civil Society. Students who have already taken LDST 102 should consider registering for LDST 101 and/or LDST 210.

Students wishing to major or minor in leadership studies should apply for admission to the Jepson School during the fall semester of their second year. For complete details, visit:
http://jepson.richmond.edu/major-minor/prospective-students/admission.html.

Please direct questions about the admissions process to Dr. Kerstin Soderlund, associate dean for student and external affairs.

Is the Jepson School right for you?

Questions?

For general academic questions:

Dr. Crystal Hoyt
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Jepson Hall 132
choyt@richmond.edu
Office: (804) 287-6825