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Advising Guide: Leadership Studies

General Information
Spring Registration Advising

Spring registration advising begins on Monday, October 21.

Students are expected to consult thoroughly and substantively with their Jepson academic advisors prior to registration. Ultimately, however, students are responsible for completing all general education, major, and minor requirements. Leadership studies requirements

The Cohort System: Prerequisites and Timing of Core Courses

The LDST required courses sequence is managed with prerequisites. Students are responsible for enrolling in the required courses in the appropriate semester.

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities and LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences must be taken by the end of sophomore year. LDST 210 Justice and Civil Society should be completed by this time as well. LDST 250 Critical Thinking and Methods of Inquiry must be taken in the spring of the sophomore year.

LDST 101, LDST 102, and LDST 250 are prerequisites for LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership. Unless studying abroad, students must take LDST 300 in the fall of the junior year.

LDST 300 is a prerequisite for LDST 450 Leadership Ethics, which must be taken in the fall of senior year. LDST 450 is not offered in the spring semester.

LDST 488 Internship should be taken in the spring of junior year (.5 units) and the fall of senior year (.5 units) for a total of 1 unit.

Registration Issues

Spring pre-registration for continuing students begins on Monday, October 28. Students are responsible for registering at their assigned times. Please carefully consult the registration rotation.

The Jepson School does not maintain waitlists for LDST required courses, however we will offer waitlisting on our elective courses. If waitlisting is available, waitlisted seats will be displayed in BannerWeb. Students who wish to enroll in a course that is at capacity should monitor BannerWeb for openings. Other students frequently drop courses, and we also routinely increase caps in courses based on demand across sections. Students who have questions or face serious conflicts because of academic or athletic commitments should contact Dr. Hoyt. Students should not request entry into closed courses from professors, and professors receiving such requests should refer students to Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Crystal Hoyt.

Advanced Courses

This spring we are offering five special topic courses, as well as several Jepson electives we want to highlight.

Special Topic Courses

•LDST 390-01    MW 9:00-10:15 am
Special Topics: Reimagining Success: Science, Society, & Innovation—Dr. Rana Dajani
“We are in a pickle” Says the contemplating frog… In this course, we will embark on a journey of discovery to reimagine success. Through case studies, stories and interviews we will explore varying perspectives of what success means and how it varies across cultures, religions, ethnicities, geographies and histories, challenging our own assumptions and unconscious biases along the way.  We will use science to inform the questions we will ask such as; who defines success, what are the forms of success, how we can reimagine success, why does success differ and how does it vary, how wild can we go?  We will draw upon our humanity and ethical values in this digital age to capture what success may look like. Through a series of hands on activities including storytelling, art, drama, games and community action; students will be constantly challenging themselves while having fun to discover their own agency and to stimulate innovation. The goal of the course is not only to challenge assumptions among students but also to stimulate them to think critically about the trajectories of human behavior in general and more importantly to change mindsets to become innovative changemakers within their own circles by adopting a human centered design approach.

•LDST 390-02    M 3:00-5:40 pm
Special Topics: Indigenous Government & Politics—Dr. David Wilkins
This course covers the history, development, and politics of Indigenous governments in the U.S. We will focus on both the evolution and alteration of these governments and the difficult political decisions Native peoples faced when confronted by the colonizing forces of European states, the federal government, and individual states. We will also examine the modifications developed by Indigenous communities in their efforts to retain and exercise their inherent and delegated powers. With over 570 federally-recognized Native polities in the U.S. our discussions will, of necessity, be general. Still, our interdisciplinary approach, rooted in politics, history, and law will enable us to leave the course with a clearer understanding about Native governments and the politics they engage in and are a part of intergovernmentally as the original sovereigns of North America.

•LDST 390-03    TR 10:30-11:45 am
Special Topics: The Democratic Prospect—Dr. Ken Ruscio
What is the future of democracy? This course assesses the state of American democracy and its future prospects by reviewing key historical and philosophical disputes that shaped the system and the expectations we have for leaders. Fundamental democratic principles are being questioned and even challenged. Interpreting and responding to those challenges are among the objectives of the course. The course will review the current condition of democracy, as seen through the eyes of several writers, as well as key stages in its development (such as the Founding Period, the Civil War and emancipation, the export of democracy, and the women’s and civil rights movements.) Within such a complex system—complex in its structure, values, and norms—what kind of political leadership is called for? The goal is for each student to acquire a deep understanding of what we mean by democracy, its present condition and future prospects. (Cross-listed with PLSC 379)

•LDST 390-04     WF 12:00-1:15 pm
Special Topics: Greek Tragedy and Political Theory—Dr. Dan Schillinger
This seminar explores Greek tragedy from the perspective of political theory. Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides were piercing observers of political life; they were also the principal educators of the Athenian democracy. Their plays raise fundamental questions about the origins of political life, the nature of democracy and its specific difference from tyranny, the responsibilities and errors of political leaders, the vulnerability of all human beings to disaster, the costs of war and empire, the causes of factional strife, and the complex relations joining men, women, and gods. We will read three plays written by each tragedian: Aeschylus’ trilogy the Oresteia; Sophocles’ Ajax, Antigone, and Oedipus Tyrannus; and Euripides’ Alcestis, Trojan Women, and Bacchae. Political philosophers beginning with Plato and Aristotle have also been eager students of these plays, even as they have reflected on the function of tragedy as a literary genre, political institution, and ethical orientation. We will read Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, and contemporary interpreters such as Bernard Williams and Bonnie Honig, whose various approaches to Greek tragedy show that this literature remains a generative source of political reflection and critique. (Cross-listed with PLSC 379)

•LDST 390-05     R 3:00-5:40 pm
Special Topics: Knowledge and the Ethics of Democratic Deliberation—Dr. Marilie Coetsee
In this course, we use contemporary philosophical texts to evaluate what ethical norms should guide citizens in their collective deliberations about public policy. In particular, we examine citizens’ obligations to assess arguments and evidence for the policies they advocate for. Three primary kinds of questions are addressed. First, how much evidence do you need to be justified in publicly advocating for a particular political policy? If other equally informed citizens disagree with you about the policy, does that undermine your justification for believing in the policy or for continuing to advocate for it? Second, what kind of evidence do you need to be justified in advocating for a political policy? Even if you have good evidence for the policy, that evidence may be based in a religious or moral worldview that other citizens don’t share. If so, to what extent are you obligated to seek out further reasons for the policy that those other citizens can also get behind? Third, we ask what sorts of civic obligations citizens have to deliberatively engage with those who disagree with them. In the course of deliberation, are we obliged to engage with all objections to our views, or are some objections so beyond the pale that it is permissible to ignore them? Further, must engagement always rely only on the use of ‘cold,’ ‘hard’ evidence, or is there also a positive role for stories and emotional appeals to play?

Other Jepson Electives

Students may find a list of all advanced and required courses offered in spring 2020 by viewing the provisional course schedule. Course descriptions can be found in the undergraduate catalog.

•LDST 306-01 MW 10:30-11:45 am
Sex, Leadership, and the Evolution of Human Societies—Dr. Chris von Rueden
This course explores how biological and cultural adaptation shape leadership and, more broadly, political organization. Through case studies drawn from primatology, cultural anthropology, and political history, students will learn what makes human leadership unique and investigate why leadership and political organization vary across human and non-human societies. Some of the questions we consider include: Why do humans adopt leader and follower roles at all? What is the political organization of other social animals, particularly the great apes? Are there any human societies that lack leadership? Are there societies in which, on average, women wield more power than men? Why are some human societies more hierarchical than others? The goal of the course is not only to expose students to the diversity of political organization in humans and other animals, but also to stimulate them to think critically about the ultimate causes of human social behavior in general.

•LDST 340-01 T 3:00-5:40 pm
Early Modern Crisis in Leadership—Dr. Peter Kaufman
This is a research seminar. Student colleagues will investigate together the formative years of the Tudor dynasty (1485 to 1535) and the crises of the 1580s as they formulate thesis topics that explore the issues and crises (relations with continental powers, religion and politics, concentration and redistribution of power, or succession to the throne) facing the Tudors at a specific time during “the long sixteenth century” (1485 – 1603). The final research paper (35-45 double-spaced pages) will include work in primary as well as secondary sources. Final grades will be based on a midterm examination scheduled for late March or early April (30%), a coherent precis of the paper to be submitted at the time of the midterm (10%) and a final paper due the last day of exams (60%).

•LDST 357-01 W 3:00-5:40 pm
The Ethics of Influence—Dr. Terry Price
This course examines the moral limits on the exercise of influence. Perhaps the most important part of a leader’s job is getting people to do things; which raises the question: what means and techniques are leaders justified in using? Perhaps rational persuasion is the most obvious candidate as the ideal form of influence, but it is not without its own problems. So what about all the other means and techniques of influence? Are they prohibited by morality and, if so, on what grounds? People would likely agree that ethical leadership does not permit coercing followers or outright lying to them. In fact, we do not typically refer to the use of force as influence, let alone as leadership. But is it permissible to engage in deception that falls short of lying? Or to bypass reason with appeals to emotion? To answer these questions and many like them, we will begin with classic texts detailing the influence tactics leaders actually use—and use effectively. Our first task, then, will be to identify the behaviors under investigation. To assess the morality of the influence tactics, we will draw on traditional moral theory as well as on contemporary philosophical literature, especially on manipulation. In the last part of the course, we will take an extended look at the morality of public policy efforts to influence behavior with “nudges.”

•LDST 375-01 MW 4:30-5:45 pm
Economic Policy & Leadership—Dr. Sandra Peart
In this course, we explore two questions using historical debates on economic policy as our laboratory. First, what is the scope for policy makers to lead the economy through cyclical and secular crises and the inevitable ups and downs that accompany economic expansion? How much agency should policy makers assume and when are unusual mechanisms called for? Second, what leadership role do economists legitimately play in the development and implementation of new economic policy? With policy debates about such issues as health care, immigration, deficit spending and international trade in mind, we will explore the written works of J.M. Keynes and Friedrich Hayek. Hayek disagreed with Keynes, on what sorts of economic policy were best suited to promote economic expansion and stability. We will explore the nature of this disagreement. Readings for the course will be drawn from Keynes’ Economic Consequences of the Peace and General Theory; Hayek’s Road to Serfdom and Law, Legislation and Liberty;  Buchanan’s Collected Works and contemporary reactions to these works; and published correspondence between Keynes and Hayek. We will also read (and view) recent commentary on various debates. (Cross-listed with ECON 260)

•LDST 377-01 MW 10:30-11:45 am
Ethical Decision Making - Health Care—Dr. Jessica Flanigan
This course provides a systematic examination of the central ethical decisions faced by health workers and leaders in the health care industry. Topics include informed consent, decision making for incompetent patients, drugs, abortion, euthanasia, disability, resource allocation, organ donation, and human enhancement. Readings by bioethicists such as Peter Singer, Judith Jarvis Thompson, Derek Parfit, and Allen Buchanan. Primary focus ethical.

•LDST 384-01 TR 12:00-1:15 pm
Education & Equity—Dr. Tom Shields
This course will examine the historical, sociological, and biological roles that poverty and class play in the American K-12 education system. We will look at the influencers associated with poverty and class and how these impact cognitive development and physical well-being in childhood and adolescence. We will also discuss the widening academic achievement gap between the rich and the poor and how educational expectations and achievement are changing based on socio-economic status. The course will conclude with a focus on the recent labor market effects that have led to the creation of an underclass in the U.S. that is not properly trained nor adequately educated for a changing 21st Century economy.

LDST 386-01 TR 9:00-10:15 am
Leadership in a Diverse Society—Dr. Crystal Hoyt
The goal of this course, broadly, is to understand how diversity affects social relations. To this end, we will examine diversity primarily through the lens of social psychology. Our focus will be on exploring inequalities and biases associated with difference; we will focus primarily on large societal groups that differ on cultural dimensions of identity such as gender, sexual orientation, and race & ethnicity. Traditional approaches to understanding diversity often located the root of inequality in overt negative attitudes. However, contemporary research into prejudice reveals that it is also often expressed in much more nuanced and subtle ways and it persists because it remains largely unrecognized. Our explorations will be based on theory and empirical evidence and we will apply this work to current events and policy issues in contexts including immigration, employment, education, health and criminal justice. (Cross-listed with PSYC 359)

Information for Seniors
Class of 2020

Senior Degree Audits
All seniors should have received an audit package from the Registrar’s office. Students should complete the relevant forms and bring a printed copy of the GradTracker audit to their major advisor to verify and sign at the advising meeting. Please check to be sure that all general education requirements have been met, as well as the requirements of the major(s) and minor(s). Advisors are encouraged to consult GradTracker to confirm the contents of the audit. Both majors and minors should submit the leadership studies forms in the Jepson drop box (located outside of Jepson Hall, Room 122), no later than November 1 at noon for final verification by Dr. Hoyt. The student is ultimately responsible for returning this form to the registrar. (All forms are due to the registrar by November 15.)

Jepson Internship (LDST 488) Requirement--For Majors ONLY
The Jepson School requires all majors to complete 240 hours in a Jepson-approved summer internship in the summer following their junior year. The internship provides the means to help students translate theory into practice. In addition to field work, students will complete several written assignments where they connect theory to practice and reflect on their experience and will submit a final portfolio. Seniors are required to complete 1 unit of LDST 488 their senior year in order to graduate.

Business Students
The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Student Research
Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis.

  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. Independent study proposals under this rubric must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member's program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt by the end of the add/drop period.
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision, in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.
  • LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis allows students to pursue research on their own topic of interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Proposals for LDST 495/496 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.

Forms for these three courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Honors
Honors students should enroll in LDST 498 Senior Honors Thesis II.

Study Abroad
Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. It should not be at the introductory level. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by Dr. Hoyt in consultation with the advisor. The Leadership Studies Request for Study Abroad Credit form can be found on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides. Students must also complete the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available on the Registrar’s website. This form must also be signed by the student’s primary advisor.

Information for Juniors
Class of 2021

Theories and Models of Leadership
Juniors studying abroad in the fall must register for LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership in the spring. Students returning from abroad will have registration priority for the spring sections.

Jepson Internship (LDST 488) Requirement—For Majors Only
The Jepson School requires all majors to complete 240 hours in a Jepson-approved summer internship in the summer following their junior year. The internship provides the means to help students translate theory into practice. In addition to field work, students will take LDST 488 (.5 units) in the spring before their internship, and again in the fall following their internship. In all, students are required to take 1 unit total of LDST 488 in order to graduate with a degree in leadership studies. Several written assignments will connect theory to practice and allow students the chance to reflect on their internship experience.

Student Research
Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis I and II, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis I and II. Independent research for academic credit requires the approval of the associate dean for academic affairs.

  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. LDST 490 proposals must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.                                   
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member’s program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt by the end of the add/drop period.  
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision, in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.
  • LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis allows students to pursue research on their own topic of interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Proposals for LDST 495/496 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.

Forms for these courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Business Students
The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Study Abroad

Junior majors, but not minors, may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the senior associate dean for academic affairs. Students must complete the leadership studies Request for Study Abroad Credit as well as the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available through the University Registrar's Office.


Junior Honors Tutorial
Juniors who have applied and been accepted into the honors program should sign up for the LDST 399 Junior Honors Tutorial.

Information for Sophomores
Class of 2022

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities and LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences
Newly admitted students must complete LDST 101 and LDST 102 by the end of sophomore year.

LDST 250 Critical Thinking
Sophomores must sign up for LDST 250 in the spring.

LDST 210 Justice and Civil Society
Sophomores who have not yet taken LDST 210 should sign up for this course in the spring.

Business Students
Beginning with the class of 2022, the Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 394 Business Ethics. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 394 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Study Abroad
Sophomore majors, but not minors, may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the senior associate dean for academic affairs. Students must complete the leadership studies Request for Study Abroad Credit as well as the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available through the University Registrar's Office.

Advisors and Advising
Sophomore majors will be assigned Jepson advisors in the near future. For the spring term registration, you will remain as an advisee of your current advisor. You will consult with your new Jepson advisor during registration this spring. If you have questions concerning Jepson School courses in the meantime, please contact Dr. Kerstin Soderlund or Dr. Crystal Hoyt. Jepson minors should also consult with Dr. Soderlund or Dr. Hoyt about course scheduling.

Questions?

For general academic questions:

Dr. Crystal Hoyt
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Jepson Hall 132
choyt@richmond.edu
Office: (804) 287-6825