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Advising Guide: Leadership Studies

General Information
Fall Registration Advising

Fall registration advising begins on Monday, March 20.

Students are expected to consult thoroughly and substantively with their Jepson academic advisors prior to registration. Ultimately, however, students are responsible for completing all general education, major, and minor requirements. Leadership studies requirements

The Cohort System: Prerequisites and Timing of Core Courses

The LDST required courses sequence is managed with prerequisites. Students are responsible for enrolling in the required courses in the appropriate semester.

LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities and LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences must be taken by the end of sophomore year. LDST 205 Justice and Civil Society should be completed by this time as well. LDST 250 Critical Thinking and Methods of Inquiry must be taken in the spring of the sophomore year.

LDST 101, LDST 102, and LDST 250 are prerequisites for LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership. Unless studying abroad, students must take LDST 300 in the fall of the junior year.

LDST 300 is a prerequisite for LDST 450 Leadership Ethics, which must be taken in the fall of senior year. LDST 450 is not offered in the spring semester.

Registration Issues

Fall pre-registration for continuing students begins on Monday, March 27. Students are responsible for registering at their assigned times. Please carefully consult the registration rotation.

The Jepson School does not maintain waitlists for LDST courses. Students who wish to enroll in a course that is at capacity should monitor BannerWeb for openings. Other students frequently drop courses, and we also routinely increase caps in courses based on demand across sections. Students who have questions or face serious conflicts because of academic or athletic commitments should contact Dr. Hoyt. Students should not request entry into closed courses from professors, and professors receiving such requests should refer students to Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Hoyt.

Advanced Courses

This fall we are offering one special topic course, as well as several Jepson electives we want to highlight.

•LDST 390-01    TR 3:00-4:15 pm   
Special Topics: Studies in Ethics Positions Theory—Dr. Donelson Forsyth
When will an act, a thought, or a motive be characterized as immoral rather than moral? Are ethics based on rational thought, emotion, or intuition? When is an action judged to be evil rather than good? This course, “Studies in Ethics Positions Theory,” rather than offering prescriptive answers to these questions, takes a descriptive approach to ethics by exploring the personal and interpersonal factors that influence moral thought, action, emotion, and motivation. The analysis will, in all cases, rely on conceptual approaches that have been supported by empirical research relevant to the moral phenomena of interest and, to narrow the focus still further, work based on Ethics Positions Theory. The course examines the theory itself, reviews empirical work testing the theory, and extends the theory by conducting original research. Knowledge of research design and analysis, including SPSS, will facilitate performance in this course.

Other Jepson Electives

•LDST 304-01    WF 10:30-11:45 am
Social Movements—Dr. Thad Williamson
This class explores the ends and means of large-scale social movements, with a particular focus on leadership processes. Our primary method of inquiry is historical, but we will draw on social and political theory, as well as (in the latter part of the course) contemporary political analysis. Throughout the course we will explore many dimensions of social movements, including the historical and political context of movements, how movements get off the ground, the variety of tactics they employ, the role of ideas and intellectual activity in social movements, how social movements invite and negotiate conflict by challenging existing institutions and social practices, the variety of forms of leadership evident in social movements, dynamics of race, gender, and class within social movements, and so on. But we will also be concerned with drawing out the implications of our learning for social change movements today, particularly those addressing economic inequality.​ Primary focus historical.

•LDST 306-01    MW 3:00-4:15 pm
Sex, Leadership, and the Evolution of Human Societies—Dr. Christopher von Rueden
In this course, we will study how biological and cultural adaptation shape leadership and, more broadly, political organization. Through cases studies drawn from primatology, cultural anthropology, and political history, students will learn about what makes human leadership unique and investigate why leadership and political organization vary across human and non-human societies. Some of the questions we consider include: Why do humans adopt leader and follower roles at all? What is the political organization of other social animals, particularly the great apes? Are there any human societies that lack leadership? Are there societies in which, on average, women wield more power than men? Why are some human societies more hierarchical than others? The goal of the course is not only to expose students to the diversity of political organization in humans and other animals but also to stimulate them to think critically about the ultimate causes of human social behavior in general.

•LDST 307-01    WF 1:30-2:45 pm
Leadership in International Contexts—Dr. Javier Hidalgo
This course examines the ethics of international leadership. Students will consider ethical issues relating to international affairs that leaders and followers confront in politics, the military, business, and the nonprofit sectors. Topics include war, global poverty, migration, and international institutions. Primary focus ethical.

•LDST 368-01    MW 3:00-4:15 pm
Leadership on Stage and Screen—Dr. Kristin Bezio
The purpose of this course is to examine leadership (and, by extension, followership) in the specific settings of theater and modern cinema. We will be studying plays and films from a variety of periods and contexts, comparing them to historical movements and to one another. As a part of this course, we will be looking at the plays and films themselves as indicative of particular socio-political movements, as well as participating in the formation, perpetuation, and criticism of their surroundings. In this way, we will look at the works examined in this course as both evaluations of leadership and as forms of leadership in and of themselves.

•LDST 378-01    TR 3:00-4:15 pm
Statesmanship: John Marshall—Dr. Gary McDowell
This course will analyze the ways in which institutional arrangements can encourage, direct, or thwart leadership. The focus in general will be on the judicial power of the United States and, in particular, on the life and judicial tenure of Chief Justice John Marshall. This will be a research and writing course and assessment will be by a major research paper. Primary focus historical. (Same as PLSC 310 and LAW 767.)

•LDST 386-01    TR 9:00-10:15 am
Leadership in a Diverse Society—Dr. Crystal Hoyt
The goal of this course is to understand how diversity affects social relations. To this end, we will examine diversity primarily through the lens of social psychology. Our focus will be on exploring inequalities associated with difference and will focus primarily on large societal groups that differ on cultural dimensions of identity such as gender, sexuality, and race and ethnicity. Our explorations will be based in theory and empirical evidence and we will apply this theoretical and empirical work to current events and relevant policy issues.

Students may find a list of all advanced and required courses offered in fall 2017 by viewing the provisional course schedule. Course descriptions can be found in the undergraduate catalog.

Information for Seniors
Class of 2018

Important Note About Leadership Ethics

Senior majors and minors must enroll in LDST 450 Leadership Ethics in the fall semester. This course will not be offered next spring; so if you do not take LDST 450 in the fall, you will be unable to graduate with a degree in leadership studies. There are no exceptions to this rule or substitutes for meeting this requirement.

Business Students

The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies.  BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Student Research

Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis.

  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. Independent study proposals under this rubric must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member's program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt by the end of the add/drop period.
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision, in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.
  • LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis provides students with the opportunity to work on a year-long independent research project of their choosing under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Proposals for LDST 495/496 must be submitted to Dr. Hoyt at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the senior thesis is to take place.

Forms for these three courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Honors

Honors students should enroll in LDST 497 Senior Honors Thesis I.

Study Abroad

Majors (but not minors) may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. It should not be at the introductory level. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by Dr. Hoyt in consultation with the student's advisor. Students must complete the leadership studies Request for Study Abroad Credit as well as the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available through the University Registrar's Office. Please direct all paperwork and study abroad questions to Michele Bedsaul.

Information for Juniors
Class of 2019

Theories and Models of Leadership

Juniors not studying abroad in the fall must register for LDST 300 Theories and Models of Leadership. Students returning from abroad in the spring will have registration priority for the spring sections.

Business Students

The Robins School of Business allows Jepson/Business dual degree seekers, double majors, and Business majors/Jepson minors to substitute LDST 450 Leadership Ethics for BUAD 392 Ethical, Social, and Legal Responsibilities of Business. This policy applies only to students who complete the major or minor in leadership studies. BUAD 392 does not fulfill the LDST 450 requirement.

Student Research

Majors may count a maximum of 1 unit of student research toward the advanced course requirement. This includes LDST 490 Independent Study, LDST 491 Collaborative Study, LDST 492 Directed Study, LDST 495/496 Senior Thesis I and II, and LDST 497/498 Senior Honors Thesis I and II. Independent research for academic credit requires the approval of the associate dean for academic affairs.
  • LDST 490 Independent Study allows students to pursue research on topics of their own choosing under the supervision of a faculty member. LDST 490 proposals must be submitted to Dr. Price at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the independent study is to take place.                                   
  • LDST 491 Collaborative Study provides students with the opportunity to conduct research collaboratively with a Jepson faculty member on a project of theoretical or methodological importance to the faculty member’s program of research. Proposals for LDST 491 must be submitted to Dr. Price by the end of the add/drop period.  
  • LDST 492 Directed Study consists of group reading and discussion, under faculty supervision,  in a specified area of leadership studies. Proposals for LDST 492 must be submitted to Dr. Price at least two weeks before the beginning of classes in the semester in which the directed study is to take place.

Forms for these courses are located on the Jepson website under Major & Minor/Forms & Guides.

Study Abroad

Junior majors, but not minors, may count a maximum of 1 unit of study abroad credit toward the advanced course requirement. This course must enhance the student’s academic plan in leadership studies. Determination of whether a course enhances a student’s academic plan in leadership studies will be made by the senior associate dean for academic affairs. Students must complete the leadership studies Request for Study Abroad Credit as well as the Study Abroad Course Approval Form, which is available through the University Registrar's Office. Please submit all paperwork and/or study abroad questions to Michele Bedsaul.

Information for Sophomores
Class of 2019

Students interested in joining the Jepson School as a major or minor must complete LDST 101 Leadership and the Humanities or LDST 102 Leadership and the Social Sciences by the end of fall semester of second year. Students who have taken LDST 101 should consider registering for LDST 102 and/or LDST 205 Justice and Civil Society. Students who have already taken LDST 102 should consider registering for LDST 101 and/or LDST 205.

Please direct questions about the admissions process to Dr. Kerstin Soderlund, associate dean for student and external affairs.

Is the Jepson School right for you?

Questions?

For general academic questions:

Dr. Crystal Hoyt
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Jepson Hall 132
choyt@richmond.edu
Office: (804) 287-6825